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2D All the way! / how are objects/terrain typically made

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c2ypt1c
12
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Joined: 13th May 2010
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Posted: 13th May 2010 20:01
Hi, I'm new to the game development scene and just wondering how 2d objects or terrain is made. I'm assuming windows paint isn't the optimal choice hahah. Can someone point me to what most devs are using to get the job done?
owlman
13
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Joined: 8th Apr 2009
Location: Italy
Posted: 19th May 2010 11:26 Edited at: 19th May 2010 13:10
EDIT - ok so you mean what programs are popular for making 2d material to import into dbpro .. I like the gimp which ppl say is as good as photoshop - but bucks stay in pocket where they belong ..

have you seen this video?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sn2cqIiETLU

if effort>reward : gosub home : endif
Van B
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20
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Joined: 8th Oct 2002
Location: Sunnyvale
Posted: 19th May 2010 12:15
Most artists will use Photoshop, personally I prefer PSP9.0 as it seems a bit more technical and exact to me. Anyway, to actually get the graphics done, in whatever art package you use, it's a case of either having the skills, or having the software.

If you wanted say, a nice mountain to use as a backdrop to a game, then the easiest way to do that is to use a terrain renderer like Bryce. Often it's very quick to put a mountain together like that, with sky and all that stuff that you might need - compared to drawing from scratch, it's a different sport altogether.

It takes practice, and lots of experiments to see what works, and fall into your own groove, and establish a style that you can stick to. It's nice to stylise, especially with more tongue in cheek games, platformers etc are much more forgiving. See I think it's better to avoid settling for a sub-standard piece of work - if it doesn't look right, do something else. It's graphical polish that determines how professional the game looks, and that covers things like animation - you have to be strict with yourself on top of everything, honest and strict when it comes to artwork - one little ugly or miss-matched thing can ruin a whole scene.


Health, Ammo, and bacon and eggs!

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