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3 Dimensional Chat / Sphere swept collision detection

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Code Dragon
16
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Joined: 21st Aug 2006
Location: Everywhere
Posted: 28th Oct 2013 05:03 Edited at: 28th Oct 2013 05:06
About 6 years ago, I wrote an engine in DBPro and developed two 3D platformers, but they had several collision detection problems I just couldn't solve no matter who's DLL I used (falling through floors, etc.) Eventually I began learning computer graphics from the ground up with DirectX 10. Unfortunately I became too perfectionist about my code, to the point where I was spending way too much time writing and refactoring code for theoretical geometry problems and had forgotten how much I liked to code games. Good news is, I've learned my lesson and am making finishing games a priority from this point forward, and am also considering pursuing a PhD. So I'm posting one of my papers here in the hopes that it will help someone. Cheers.

http://arxiv.org/ftp/arxiv/papers/1211/1211.0059.pdf

I don't know who maintains the collision detection libraries here nowadays, but I'd be happy to collaborate.
Phaelax
DBPro Master
19
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Joined: 16th Apr 2003
Location: Metropia
Posted: 31st Oct 2013 22:41
Quote: " I became too perfectionist about my code"

No such thing!

In my opinion, "finishing" a game is the hardest part. It's all that polish that makes me lose interest. The collision engine in your case would've been my primary focus of the game, after which I finished writing it I'd probably would've been bored with the rest and likely never finish. Actually, I have done just that also with a swept-sphere system I learned from this paper: http://www.peroxide.dk/papers/collision/collision.pdf


I'll read over your paper and see if I can give any feedback since I am at least familiar with the concepts. Btw, what's your masters in?

Code Dragon
16
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Joined: 21st Aug 2006
Location: Everywhere
Posted: 14th Nov 2013 11:40
My degree's in Computer Science. I feel like I used to be able to focus on finishing a game, back when I was starting small and there wasn't much to polish, but these days I'm finding that I procrastinate by studying the theory and mathematics behind it, and maybe implementing an algorithm or two. Then I skip all the "easy" flow control code and stuff I "know" I can do because I've gotten bored with it, so it remains an unusable tech demo - only no one ever learns about the tech because I haven't built a game around it! I had the same problem with my kd-tree implementation.

Any ideas on how to make the mental switch from "making cool tech that could be used in a game" to "making a game that has cool tech?" lol

Real programmers don't die, they just GOSUB without RETURN
Ortu
DBPro Master
15
Years of Service
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Joined: 21st Nov 2007
Location: Austin, TX
Posted: 17th Nov 2013 21:32
Quote: "Any ideas on how to make the mental switch from "making cool tech that could be used in a game" to "making a game that has cool tech?" lol"


You just need to work on a game in which you are more excited about the game concept as a whole than in the specific tech that goes in to it.

If you have trouble coming up with game ideas to hold your excitement, then maybe you should look in to collaborating with another programmer/designer so that you can focus on the tech that holds your interest and they can focus on the game that holds theirs.

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