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Geek Culture / 100 Year Old Website?

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Dark Java Dude 64
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 04:57
That's right, it's a social networking website for individuals of age 100!!

Jokes aside, I had an interesting thought the other day, and thought it may (or may not) spark some interesting conversation.

Will a website ever exist long enough to have its 100th birthday? Maybe that's not the best question. Rather, what will things be like when the internet (primarily mainstream websites such as Google) have been around for 100 years? Will the internet be obsolete by then, replaced by some radical new technology? Perhaps the internet will be integrated into every little part of our lives? Perhaps virtual reality will take over true reality! I wager it won't get quite that far in 100 years.

Or perhaps, will major internet corporations take a fall before they reach their 100th birthday? Perhaps Google and Facebook won't be around by then.

Just an interesting thought I had! Perhaps it will spark some interesting conversation. Where do you folks think things will be when websites start passing the century mark?

BatVink
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 10:28 Edited at: 6th Jan 2015 17:08
Quote: "I wager it won't get quite that far in 100 years"


100 years ago we didn't have...

Tanks
Radio
Aerosol cans
Jet engines
Radar
Ball point pens
Helicopters
Penicillin
Televisions
Programmable computers
Nuclear Fission
Missiles
Transistors (used in nearly every electronic product!)
Solar power
Integrated circuits
Lasers
Audio tapes
and of course Space exploration

The Internet will be 100 in 2069.
The World Wide Web will be 100 in 2089.

The next big step seems to be the Internet Of Things. Instead of just looking at information on a screen, the information interacts with anything.
The example I use with my parents and other people who scrunch their faces up at the idea is fridge freezers that are already in the IoT. There are broadband-connected fridges that are event-aware. So if there's a huge sporting event (e.g FA World Cup final), the fridge/freezer ensures it is at the right temperature before half-time and switches off. When everyone goes to make a cup of coffee and switches their kettles on, the fridges are not part of the huge electricity surge across the country.

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur
MrValentine
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 11:01
Quote: "The next big step seems to be the Internet Of Things. Instead of just looking at information on a screen, the information interacts with anything.
The example I use with my parents and other people who scrunch their faces up at the idea is fridge freezers that are already in the IoT. There are broadband-connected fridges that are event-aware. So if there's a huge sporting event (e.g FA World Cup final), the fridge/freezer ensures it is at the right temperature before half-time and switches off. When everyone goes to make a cup of coffee and switches their kettles on, the fridges are not part of the huge electricity surge across the country."


I do hope that is TURN-OF-ABLE as I do not give a damn about sporting events....... I want my fridge in form all day long...

Hmm... I think Websites will become extinct within 86 years and Apps will replace them [Or something better?], it is only logical... Apps provide better functionality... Just my view...

Thraxas
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 12:17
Quote: "The World Wide Web will be 100 in 1989."


Santa has been messing around with his time machine again.
Green Gandalf
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 16:17
Ha! Well spotted!



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BatVink
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:09 Edited at: 6th Jan 2015 17:11
I have gone back in time and edited it before the forum even existed. Thus your comments are now meaningless as it was resolved before you wrote them, and now you look foolish.

Except for that bit that says Edited: 6th Jan 2015 16:08. That's the flaw in my plan.

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur
Indicium
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:13
Quote: "I do hope that is TURN-OF-ABLE as I do not give a damn about sporting events....... I want my fridge in form all day long... "


Why? It obviously won't affect the performance of your fridge, they turn on and off all the time. When lots of people turn their kettles on at the same time the national grid does not produce enough electricity. There are no reserve batteries or anything like that in the national grid (that I know about anyway, maybe my knowledge is limited) all the electricity has to be generated on the fly. Generators at power stations take hours to spin up, so if the electricity load is greater than output, you'll get a blackout. There's solutions to this, such as pumping water up somewhere high, and then dropping it when you need power, and using hydroelectric generators as a sort of battery. But this is working around the problem that the power usage massively spiked, if you can get rid of the spike then problem solved. The fridge idea sounds great to me.
MrValentine
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:18
Oh I see what you mean now, a timer based fridge >.< with dynamic timing...

Yeah I have been watching info about the NatGrid and find it quite interesting!

Hey what is your tap water quality like where you live? Is it dense or not so dense water?

I live in Manchester which still holds the best tap water in the world lol but I still use a Brita Filter... You?

Indicium
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:28
Apparently quite hard, the water that comes out of the tap at my house is disgusting, I always filter it, or drink bottled water.
MrValentine
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:31
Damn... You seen those sand rock filter buckets?

Matty H
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 17:35
In the future everyone will stock up on 'matter' which you feed into your 3D printer. When you buy some clothes online your printer will get permission to print one unit of whatever you purchased.

More complex items will be printed at your local print factory, here is where they print your fridge, car and house

Ortu
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 18:19
Printing will certainly be more widespread but just as cast metal will always be structurally weaker than forged or die-struck, some things will always be fashioned with more traditional methods

BatVink
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 21:05
If the National Grid produces too much power, it can be even worse. Then you get spikes, which start to blow devices. The biggest problem is the lag between production and need, as it is a very physical process. People who predict power requirements are paid huge amounts, but the responsibilities are just as high.

Worst case scenario is last minute extra time, ie the game becomes a draw in the last few minutes of normal time. The Grid has been ramped up to cater for all those kettles, then they don't get switched on. This may sound like a ridiculous problem, but it's very real.

There's a couple of stories here, apparently Britain has the biggest problem because of our tea drinking habits.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/britainfromabove/stories/people/teatimebritain.shtml (probably only watchable in UK)

http://www.nationalgridconnecting.com/managing-the-cup/

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur
Indicium
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Posted: 6th Jan 2015 23:51
Truly British problems.
Wolf
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 01:54
Quote: "Or perhaps, will major internet corporations take a fall before they reach their 100th birthday? Perhaps Google and Facebook won't be around by then."


I think google will remain while facebook will perish.
Perhaps the internet will then be an interplanetary network rather than a global one. The differences between 2015 and 1915 are so staggering that its hard to predict!



-Wolf

"When I contradict myself, I am telling the truth"
"absurdity has become necessity"
Dark Java Dude 64
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 02:52
I knew this would spark some fun conversation.

Quote: "Santa has been messing around with his time machine again."
This had me laughing pretty hard.

This whole take on the British tea kettle thing is interesting. As an American reading all this, I can only compare it to everyone suddenly deciding to make coffee at the same time. That would be interesting. However, I imagine there may be a surge of coffee makers turning on in the mornings; that's when everyone here in the States enjoys their coffee. Heck, with automated coffee makers, many of them probably turn on at the top and bottom of the morning hours at the same time.

Is coffee popular there in Europe? Tea exists around here for sure, but people don't make a big deal of it. From my viewpoint, it seems that tea is primarily a thing drunken by health conscious individuals during the winter months here in the States.

Indicium
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 02:54
Quote: "Is coffee popular there in Europe?"


My room mate drinks coffee?
MrValentine
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 04:53
There is talk about using Batteries across the grid to store huge amounts of surge power to prevent spikes...

I am glad I have had an RCD switch box installed, it truly works as I found out once when I for some reason placed a baking tray with Foil on it in the oven [Electric Inverter Microwave with Convection Oven] and it has a grill at the top, the foil struck the grill, and the switch [Consumer Unit <-- What a stupid name] tripped off, and the best bit, my oven works just fine! I also have a surge protector block on my desk for my systems and devices

My point? Get a surge protector!

RCD [Residual-Current Device ]I think that stuff is called in a mains system, shame they are not fitted as standard in many houses, but I think New Builds have them...

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Residual-current_device

Clonkex
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 05:43
Quote: "Apparently quite hard, the water that comes out of the tap at my house is disgusting, I always filter it, or drink bottled water."


We don't live in town so we're on tank water. It's crystal clear and delicious all the time

Quote: "I think google will remain while facebook will perish."


Indeed, I'd agree with that.

Quote: "Perhaps the internet will then be an interplanetary network rather than a global one."


The issue with that is that even at the speed of light it takes at least 3 minutes for a signal to get from Earth to Mars. My money's on some form of quantum physics finding a way to send signals to any place in the universe, instantly.

Incidentally, I expect to see artificial gravity (i.e. control over inertia) invented in my lifetime, and hope to see warp drives of some form based on quantum physics.

Quote: "My point? Get a surge protector!"


Speaking of which, we had a whole host of electrical things fried in our house a few weeks ago. We live on 20 acres, and have a few cows and things, so we have to have electric fences to keep them in. Obviously, three strands of galvanised wire running around most of our fencing acts like a massive lighting attractor.

Normally when we see a lightning storm coming, we disconnect all sensitive appliances from the wall, even if they're surge protected, and we disconnect the wires that hook up the fence itself from the electric fence energiser. Now, a properly-installed fence energiser will have a lightning arrestor in the line between the fence and the energiser, which should prevent lightning going backwards from the fence to the energiser. Our fence has an arrestor, but it's only a little one and was never rated for full lightning strikes.

This particular storm began in the middle of the night, so when we all woke up to sounds of thunder and heavy rain, it didn't occur to us to go around and disconnect everything. We forgot to disconnect the energiser.

At around breakfast time (~8am), we heard a truly enormous BANG out in the paddock. Dad said he saw the flash. As would be expected with a direct lightning strike, everything in the house immediately switched off. About an hour later we saw Country Energy (or whatever they're called now) pull up in a neighbour's paddock, then proceed to use a long stick to poke at what we presumed to be a giant, resettable lightning protector. Shortly after, the power came back on.

Dad, who's doing Uni online, immediately reset the internet and began attempting to connect. It wasn't working, so he called me in (from out in the bus) to fix it. I poked around for ages but couldn't see why it was refusing to work. I traced ethernet cables until I realised the 8-port gigabit switch was dead. I ran and grabbed the identical one from my sisters' room and tried it... dead too.

Then Dad remembered that the strike had hit our electric fence, and I went to check the energiser. It was still connected (CRAP) and it wasn't going (oh GREAT). These mains fence energisers are REALLY expensive, especially the big ones we need for our fence.

To cut a long story a bit shorter, these are the items that are known to be fried (luckily our big TV and expensive sound system are not among them!):

- 2 x TP-Link 8-port gigabit switch
- 2 x Oricom cordless phones (one of which was a wireless-base-host model)
- 1 x Ethernet port on Dad's PC's motherboard
- 1 x Xbox 360 S Black 250GB
- 1 x Thunderbird Mains Fence Energiser

The list isn't as long as it could have been, but it's caused no end of trouble. The fence isn't energised now, so the cows keep getting out (although luckily we had a tiny little D-cell battery-powered energiser which seems to be discouraging them). We no longer have cordless phones so can't walk around whilst talking to people (which is not just a luxury, it's a practicality). We had to buy a gigabit PCI-e ethernet card (admittedly not expensive). Ours sisters have all sorts of trouble connecting to the network for multiplayer games because they're relying on an out-of-range wifi connection. And most annoying of all... the Xbox is dead, which means our DLNA client has been forced back to a truly crappy Sony BD player. It's plain frustrating trying to find the right video in the Blu-Ray's menu system, and then half the time it won't actually play the video.

However, every cloud has a silver lining, as they say. First, none of our many expensive PCs or laptops were killed (aside from the ethernet port on Dad's mobo). Second, we have INSURANCE! We've had home insurance for years but never once had to use it. We didn't even consider it until one of the guys at the local computer shop where we took the Xbox (we weren't 100% sure it was permanently dead - it was) suggested they could make a list of confirmed-dead parts for insurance purposes. Lightbulb! The third silver lining is that our energiser was on its way out. We'd had it for years, and the LED voltage display no longer functioned correctly, and we weren't convinced it was putting out the 10,000 volts it was supposed to be.

The NRMA was more than happy, it seems, to replace all our damaged equipment for us. We're just waiting for them to go over the list, and then for the computer shop to finish the report, and we should be on our way to getting out Xbox back! Finally!

Here's a big thing we learned from all this: Even top-of-the-line lightning-grade surge protectors will do nothing if the lightning comes from the other side. That is, it turns out houses have lightning arrestors on them to soak up the vast majority of the surge, so that the surge boards don't have so much work. If the energy bypasses that arrestor (by coming from an electric fence, say) the surge protectors do nothing; more than that, they become highly conductive inside.

MrValentine
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 06:49 Edited at: 7th Jan 2015 06:57
Hmm, Perhaps big wooden fences? World War style!

Just do it slowly over time... no need for the whole fencing straight away... it by bit and you will save on the power and can repurpose your generators for other uses...

EDIT

Although....... thinking about it... Wood in a hot country....... ah scrap that idea >.<

EDIT

Had a sudden thought, could be fun to visit Clonkex in the Underworld [LOL] and went to check flight prices, £700~900 [About $1,500 USD] and guessing an apartment for 2 weeks would be just as much, and for me, food just as much, so in all a budget of £3,000~ [$5,000~ USD]

I still think pretty cheap... [The Spas are a bit shoddy though...]

Do we Brits need VISAS to visit the Underworld?

Dark Java Dude 64
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 14:16
Quote: "Wood in a hot country....... ah scrap that idea"
Why? Wood it catch on fire?

MrValentine
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Posted: 7th Jan 2015 14:39
[Pretending to ignore the use of the word there lol]

You not watching the news lately I guess, they have huge bush fires there...

I know the fences might have wooden posts but I am assuming their posts are metallic...

And wood treatment for such cases can be pricy..., unless using logs...

Whatever, Clonkex can tell us more as he might be more experienced in the area of wood...



Also, even metal nails can attract lightning, thus causing huge sections of a wooden fence to burn out completely... by the sounds of it, their current method just redirects it...

Clonkex
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Posted: 8th Jan 2015 07:44 Edited at: 8th Jan 2015 07:59
Quote: "Had a sudden thought, could be fun to visit Clonkex in the Underworld [LOL] and went to check flight prices, £700~900 [About $1,500 USD] and guessing an apartment for 2 weeks would be just as much, and for me, food just as much, so in all a budget of £3,000~ [$5,000~ USD]"


lol you can try to visit me but I'm not much of one for talking to people Plus it'd be like, "Mum, Dad, this is some guy from the UK who I don't really know!" lol

Quote: "Do we Brits need VISAS to visit the Underworld?"


I believe so

Quote: "I know the fences might have wooden posts but I am assuming their posts are metallic..."


??

Our boundary fences currently are barbed wire on the top strand with normal galvanised wire strands below. Most of the posts are thick but old and rotten wood (and most of the fences are sorta falling over). Shortly after we moved here we installed three-strand electric wires on the inside of the fence. It has stand-offs keeping it away from the normal (grounded) wires and the star pickets and wooden posts.

A big heavy wooden fence would be totally impractical. It would be expensive and ineffective at keeping the roos out. It would also not last as long as a new steel- or concrete-post fence and would be inflexible.

MrValentine
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Posted: 8th Jan 2015 08:16
OOOH Concrete, is that possible there without reinforcement[rebar]?

Ah you cannot be that socially awkward lol

Hmm, VISAS, meh...

Dark Java Dude 64
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Posted: 8th Jan 2015 14:13 Edited at: 8th Jan 2015 14:13
Quote: "Ah you cannot be that socially awkward lol"
Many of us are IRL. I may sound social on these forums, but wow am I awkward in real situations. This is a computer software development forum, after all.

Indicium
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Posted: 8th Jan 2015 16:59
I'm not an awkward person.
Dark Java Dude 64
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Posted: 8th Jan 2015 23:11
Quote: "I'm not an awkward person."
I said many.

Clonkex
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Posted: 9th Jan 2015 07:52
Quote: "Ah you cannot be that socially awkward lol"


I feel like throwing up at the thought of having to talk to anyone I don't know, but once forced into it whoever I'm talking to won't know I'm not outgoing

On forums, though, I have as long as I want to think what I'm going to say

MrValentine
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Posted: 11th Jan 2015 01:17
You know, the first speech I ever did publically, was not difficult because of it being my first crowded speech, it was the situation... [that is another story altogether], but the second, third, fourth etc. etc. from the second speech onwards I never had an issue... and I am talking tens to the hundreds... [I wonder if I were in front of thousands, what would my reaction be on the first instance...]

Odd thing though, if you saw my videos recently you will notice I say Umm, Hmm etc. often, I do the same on radio interviews... but on live speeches in front of a crowd, I have next to no issues... Bizarre no?

bitJericho
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Posted: 11th Jan 2015 03:05
Quote: " I say Umm, Hmm"


There is a way to fix that.

http://www.artofmanliness.com/2012/06/14/becoming-well-spoken-how-to-minimize-your-uhs-and-ums/

(I'd also recommend the above for women!)

Phaelax
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Posted: 12th Jan 2015 19:35
Quote: "100 years ago we didn't have...

Tanks
Radio
Aerosol cans
Jet engines
Radar
Ball point pens
Helicopters
Penicillin
Televisions
Programmable computers
Nuclear Fission
Missiles
Transistors (used in nearly every electronic product!)
Solar power
Integrated circuits
Lasers
Audio tapes
and of course Space exploration"


Though aerosol didn't come around under the late 20s, it was a concept as far back as the late 1700s. (supposedly) We had radio 100 years ago. Penicillin, though not credited to Fleming until 1928, was published in a thesis in 1897. The ballpoint pen was launched in 1888.

Lasers, well, you got me there.


"I like offending people, because I think people who get offended should be offended." - Linus Torvalds
MrValentine
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Posted: 12th Jan 2015 19:55
I do believe Space Exploration began with Galileo or the Egyptians or earlier...

But if you mean, Star Trek, we are still working on that, but if you mean sending high tech stuff out into space... It counts as a half point

On a contemporary note... Anybody here volunteering for a Mars Trip?

When that happens, we officially achieved (unless you count the moon, which to be honest is in our back yard...) Space Exploration... If you count a one way trip as a success

Just Saying

Clonkex
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Posted: 13th Jan 2015 12:13
Quote: "On a contemporary note... Anybody here volunteering for a Mars Trip?"


No, but I think MarsOne is pretty awesome! Completely pointless, but awesome nonetheless

BatVink
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Posted: 13th Jan 2015 23:43
Quote: " We had radio 100 years ago. "


Let me qualify that - broadcast radio - 1919


Quote: "Penicillin, though not credited to Fleming until 1928, was published in a thesis in 1897."


Time travel is published in many theses, but I think you'll agree we can't do it yet.

Quote: "The ballpoint pen was launched in 1888"


Maybe I should qualify again. 1941 was the first patent for a commercially successful pen. There were previous patents for pens that never worked well enough to be manufactured.

Quote: "I do believe Space Exploration began with Galileo or the Egyptians or earlier..."


They studied space, but I don't believe they got any closer to exploration than jumping off a high cliff.

Quote: "On a contemporary note... Anybody here volunteering for a Mars Trip?"


YES

Quidquid latine dictum sit, altum sonatur
MrValentine
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Posted: 14th Jan 2015 03:58
Ah I read that last year!



Clonkex
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Posted: 14th Jan 2015 07:12
Quote: "They studied space, but I don't believe they got any closer to exploration than jumping off a high cliff."


LOL

Quote: "YES"


Oh man I forgot about that!

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