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Geek Culture / Different Programming Languages

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Chrissell
9
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Joined: 2nd Apr 2013
Location:
Posted: 31st Mar 2022 15:25
Hi,
I just wanted to ask if anyone has tried learning other programming languages as well as darkbasic and AGK2. I am finding that AGK2 seems to be able to do all the things I want. I did a course in C in the 1990s in evening classes and found it really interesting. But I was disappointed that there didnt seem to be any graphics commands. Ive had a go at Python, HTML and CSS which have lots of graphics commands. I recently tried using c++ but I can only find a graphics.h include add on which compiles of Borland C.++. This seems to only have very basic graphics commands. I was reading that game engines and games are written in the C++ language. but i dont see how they are? I am still learning AGK2 and find it really nice and quite easy to learn compared to C++ and Python. I really like HTML and CSS for web design and find them nice to learn. well I am going to crack on with my studies.
Thanks
Chris
C.R.Sellen
Kevin Picone
20
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Joined: 27th Aug 2002
Location: Australia
Posted: 1st Apr 2022 12:41 Edited at: 1st Apr 2022 12:44
Quote: "
I just wanted to ask if anyone has tried learning other programming languages as well as darkbasic and AGK2
"


Yes..

You know that you can use AppGameKit from C++ right ? as well as C# / Java & Python




https://www.appgamekit.com/

PlayBASIC To HTML5/WEB - Convert PlayBASIC To Machine Code

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Chrissell
9
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Joined: 2nd Apr 2013
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Posted: 1st Apr 2022 20:59
Thanks for the reply Kevin,
Thats a great link to some great info.
I will be reading up on it tommorow.
Cheers
Chris
C.R.Sellen
Phaelax
DBPro Master
19
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Joined: 16th Apr 2003
Location: Metropia
Posted: 2nd Apr 2022 13:41
I'd say many if not most of us who've been around here for awhile know multiple languages. I don't think you could get by in the industry with only know 1 language. The trouble comes when you switch between them on a regular basis, you might write something that your brain is telling you is perfectly good syntax. However, after staring at it for 10min wondering why it doesn't compile you realize it's in the wrong language!

I'd say python is a good one to learn, it's been on my list for a long time I just haven't had the time. If you want to do web stuff, javascript is a must at a bare minimum. Typescript, node.js, react would be what I'd suggest for someone wanting to get into the web market. If you want to work in the IT field (not necessarily as a developer), I'd say powershell and bash would be worth knowing.

It's been over 10 years since I did anything with java professionally, but I still use it in my hobby projects.
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Chrissell
9
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Joined: 2nd Apr 2013
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Posted: 2nd Apr 2022 22:10
Thanks for the reply Phaelax,
Thanks for the info. Im taking note of the languages and links. I find this such an interesting subject.
Cheers!
Chris
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Steve Ancell
16
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Joined: 16th Feb 2006
Location: Brighton, East Sussex, UK
Posted: 3rd Apr 2022 19:10
I use AppGameKit Studio. I'm also learning Godot, it's a bit of a steep learning curve though for someone that's used hand coding most of their life.
Chrissell
9
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Posted: 3rd Apr 2022 19:48
Hi Steve/ Thanks for replying. Ive never heard of Godot. Im going to look that up.
I have today downloaded the AppGameKit for Python extension and it seems to be working really nice.
The demos are good .
Cheers
Chris
C.R.Sellen
Steve Ancell
16
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Joined: 16th Feb 2006
Location: Brighton, East Sussex, UK
Posted: 3rd Apr 2022 20:57
@Chrissell:
If you're going to try learning Godot then YouTube is your friend, it's a lot easier to learn through videos than trying to learn from the documents.
TheComet
14
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Joined: 18th Oct 2007
Location: I`m under ur bridge eating ur goatz.
Posted: 9th May 2022 12:19 Edited at: 10th May 2022 12:33
If you're looking into learning C++ for gamedev, the best thing you can do is to choose a simple graphics library and/or game engine and just stick to learning how to work with that library. Every one is different so every time you change the engine you use, you're basically starting from scratch again and will have to learn how to use that new engine.

C++ is quite the show especially these days with a new standard coming out every 3 years, while trying to maintain backwards compatibility with the last 30 years.

I recommend first learning how to set up a project using CMake. Almost all popular C++ libraries use CMake so this is a great starting point to ease yourself into the workflow of C++ development and it'll make adding libraries to your projects easier down the road.

I also recommend learning how to use git and registering an account on github.com or gitlab.com, where you can host the projects you create.

For libraries, I would recommend starting with SFML. It's designed for 2D graphics, and it has really good documentation, tutorials and examples you can use. And it's simple in design.

If you're looking for a simple 3D engine, Urho3D is possibly one of the most elegantly designed ones I've come across. It's a bit obscure, but it's very easy to build and it has all of the features you would expect an engine to have (physics, animation, UI, pathfinding, audio, IK, etc.) while still being very small in size. Godot is another good one, but the problem with this one is that it encourages you to use their scripting language rather than C++ to develop the games, so if your goal is to learn C++ it's probably not the best choice.

When it comes to learning the C++ language and all of its pitfalls, you might want to pick up a book. For me personally, I started with a book called "Road From C to C++" and I can't find it on google, weird. The "C++ for Dummies" book is also quite good. The book will help give you an overview of the syntax, the tools, and the standard library, but most of it I learned through writing lots and lots of code and googling.

Good luck!
Phaelax
DBPro Master
19
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Joined: 16th Apr 2003
Location: Metropia
Posted: 9th May 2022 18:38
Quote: "I also recommend learning how to use git and registering an account on github.com or gitlab.com, where you can host the projects you create."


I second this as well. Knowing how to manage your project from git command line will help a lot in the long run. It's more fun when you use an IDE with git built-in (such as eclipse).
Tiled TMX Importer V.2
XML Parser V.2
Base64 Encoder/Decoder
Purple Token - Free online hi-score database
Legend of Zelda

"I like offending people, because I think people who get offended should be offended." - Linus Torvalds

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