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Dark GDK / Liscense...

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Keaz
19
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2003
Location: Somewhere in south Texas
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 01:32
Beyond the No selling part of the Freeware version is there any differences in the two version SDK software or is it a liscense only thing?

Sephnroth
20
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Joined: 10th Oct 2002
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 01:45
its a license thing, both versions have the same command sets/functionality in your actual dev enviroment.

Keaz
19
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2003
Location: Somewhere in south Texas
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 01:54 Edited at: 8th Aug 2005 01:55
Then why the two licenses? If your going to make the commercial license so much more then at least give the source code with it. Then if there is a bug that a professional game developer needs to work around they can do so and won't need to wait for a bug fix. That is unless TGC responds quicker to bug fix requests by commercial license holders?

At this point I think I'm going to look at open source engines.

Sephnroth
20
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Joined: 10th Oct 2002
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 07:21
Judging by your general responses to most things to do with the SDK I would suggest that it possiably isnt the product for you. For that matter i;m not sure there IS a product for you XD

But simply because a commercial license is worth that much more and then some. If you are selling your game, you can afford the license. 10 dollars a copy (less than some shareware) will see you only needing 9 sales to break even and i'm sure if you are seriously looking for a commercial viable engine that you intend to sell more than 9 copies of whatever you are making.

We do not require the source. It would of course be nice, it always is, but its THEIR product right there and their work. It has bugs yes, so does ever other software product out there. Patches get released when they can. If you ever make that commercial game i'm sure you will find it hard to keep up with your user base's bug fix requests too Especially if your user base is as big as the humongus one that streches over the variety of TGC's products.

Keaz
19
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2003
Location: Somewhere in south Texas
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 08:43
It is okay I've decided the best thing for me is a freeware open source 3D engine. I plan on this being a large commercial product. The fee wasn't the issue but I've found a better suited free alternative. The source is "required" to be able to debug your end product properly. I'd need to be able to fix bugs in the engine as well as in my source. It's about supporting your customers. I don't plan on making the same mistake I've seen TGC make with their IDE(outsourcing with no source. I do like the issue of ease of use and a low learning curve for DB users, but I also need even more to be able to support my customers. My relationship with TGC this forum and their products will continue. Mostly for testing ideas and helping other forum members. I might contribute to other products and will leave my source for my adventures into the api intact at least for a while. I may even right a few DLL's once I become more familar with C++. These will be on request and most likely free.

Next, If the bugs are so many you can't keep up with them then it was still a beta product not ready for release. Also the "bugs" tend to be lessen the more you restrict the end user. TGC has put very few restrictions in place. This is what makes their's an execellent product but a support nightmare. However a game usually restricts the user a little more as you don't have over 1000 interacting commands to debug.

Finally, I'd like to say thanks to TGC for what you've had to offer me. Your software is able to produce commercially viable products. However if you want to see my intrest return I'd suggest thinking about an limited open source commercial license. (Even a moderately high priced one if your engine really is that good.)

P.S. One final question. Would you consider allowing someone too purchase a strict open source license in order to make and be able to support a large commercial product?

Please someone from TGC answer this.

Mike Johnson
TGC Developer
20
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Joined: 13th Sep 2002
Location: United Kingdom
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 10:18
Keaz - your question about the source would be best answered by Rick. His email address is rick@thegamecreators.com
Keaz
19
Years of Service
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Joined: 22nd Sep 2003
Location: Somewhere in south Texas
Posted: 8th Aug 2005 10:56
OK Thx, I'll email him about it.

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